Wu Yuren Arrest

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Date: 2010 to 2011

Region: Asia

Subject: Government Censorship

Medium: Protest


Wuyuren.jpeg

Subject: Wu Yuren

Confronting Bodies: Chinese government

Dates of Action: May 31st, 2010 to June 2011

Location: Beijing, China

Description of Incident: Chinese artist Wu Yuren was arrested on charges of assault after being assaulted himself in a protest.

The Incident: In February of 2010, Wu Yuren, along with 20 other artists, protested the destruction of the Beijing art districts 008 and Zhengyang. He was beaten terribly, and then charged with assaulting police officers. He went to jail from May 31st of 2010 to June of 2011. (New York Times)

Results of Incident: Yuren's wife, an American citizen, campaigned to have him released. He a great deal of international support. One particular instance that drew attention to his case was when Ai WeiWei mentioned it in an op-ed piece to British Prime Minister David Cameron. Ai wrote to deplore the Prime Minister's lack of comment on China's human rights violations. Yuren received press in the United States, in such high profile publications as The New York Times and The New Yorker. He has become known by the nickname "Little Ai," as people associate both his photography and activist work with Ai Weiwei. Yuren has not been deterred from activism, and continues to speak out against the government on his Weibo account.

Sources:

  • Chayka, Kyle. "Chinese Art Activist Wu Yuren Returns to Ruins of Bulldozed Arts District." Hyperallergic — Sensitive to Art and Its Discontents. 11 Aug. 2011. Web. 18 Dec. 2011 [[1]]
  • Chayka, Kyle. ""Little Ai" Goes to Court." Hyperallergic — Sensitive to Art and Its Discontents. 9 Nov. 2011. Web. 17 Dec. 2011 [[2]]
  • Jacobs, Andrew. "Wu Yuren, Activist Chinese Artist, Goes on Trial - NYTimes.com." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 17 Nov. 2010. Web. 18 Dec. 2011. [[3]]
  • Osnos, Evan. "Letter from China: Little Ai." The New Yorker. 12 July 2010. Web. 17 Dec. 2011 [[4]]