Difference between revisions of "Main Page"

From Censorpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m
 
(14 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Display censorship incident
 
|ongoing=no
 
|year=2016
 
|region=North America
 
|artist=Jay Critchley,
 
|subject=Political/Economic/Social Opinion
 
|medium=Design, Mixed Media, Performance Art
 
|date_of_action=October-November 2016
 
|location=Florida
 
|description_of_content=Multimedia artist and environmental activist Jay Critchley placed the Florida State Seal inside the "o" in the Mobil Oil logo for his project “Mobil Warming” that challenges Governor Rick Scott's denial of global warming. The Mobil Warming graphic is posted on Critchley’s website. Critchley has used the Mobil Warming logo in other projects in the past, including “Miami Beige.”
 
|description_of_incident=Critchley received a "cease and desist" letter from the State of Florida stating that he may not use the state logo without permission and before express prior written approval. The artist contacted NCAC, which put him in touch with a Florida lawyer, and he has challenged the state’s demand.
 
|description_of_result="Upon the recommendation of the National Coalition Against Censorship, Critchley got his own lawyer, Lawrence Walters, of the Walters Law Group of Florida. Walters said he took the case pro bono.
 
 
"Walters wrote to Adam Tanenbaum, general counsel for the Florida Department of State, on Nov. 3 stating that Critchley's use of the seal is freedom of speech protected under the First Amendment.
 
 
"Walters cited several cases in the letter, including Texas v. Johnson, the 1989 U.S. Supreme Court finding that burning the flag was protected by the First Amendment.
 
 
"'Laws which impose an unconstitutional permitting scheme, such as those at issue here, may be disregarded with impunity,' Walters wrote.
 
 
"He said he has not heard back from Tanenbaum."
 
Via: [http://www.capecodtimes.com/news/20161209/artwork-sparks-free-speech-debate Artwork sparks free speech debate, Cape Cod Times, Dec 9, 2016]
 
|image=Mobil Warming FL with slogan.jpeg
 
}}
 
 
*<big>[[Form:Censorship_incident|'''Add a Case''']]</big>  
 
*<big>[[Form:Censorship_incident|'''Add a Case''']]</big>  
 
__NOTOC__
 
__NOTOC__
Line 33: Line 10:
 
----
 
----
 
<!--        PASTE INCIDENT BELOW.        -->
 
<!--        PASTE INCIDENT BELOW.        -->
 +
{{Display censorship incident
 +
|ongoing=no
 +
|year=1939
 +
|region=North America
 +
|artist=Billie Holiday; Censored song: "Strange Fruit"
 +
|subject=Political/Economic/Social Opinion
 +
|confronting_bodies=U.S. Radio and performance spaces
 +
|medium=Music
 +
|date_of_action=1939
 +
|description_of_content="Strange Fruit" is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939. It first appeared as apoem in 1937 under the title “Bitter Fruit” in the union publication The New York Teacher, having been written by a New York City public school teacher, Abel Meeropol. Set in the rustic loveliness of the “gallant South”, the poem provided a description of a “black body swinging in the southern breeze” with “the bulging eyes and the twisted mouth”; the scent of magnolia is supplanted by the stench of burning flesh.  Meeropol set the poem to music. It protests American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. “Strange Fruit” has been called the original protest song.
 +
 +
In early 1939, Billie Holiday was performing in the newly-opened nightclub Café Society in lower Manhattan. Meeropol asked Barney Josephson, the owner of the club, if Holiday would sing it. She sang it to a stunned audience that broke into applause.
 +
 +
Holiday asked her label, Columbia, to record it but they declined, fearing a backlash. She went to Commodore Records; accompanied by her eight-piece Café Society band, they recorded it in a single afternoon. “Strange Fruit” would become her biggest hit and signature track.
 +
|description_of_incident=The song was blacklisted. Performance of the song was banned in some US cities for fear of provoking civil unrest. It was blocked From U.S. Radio stations.
 +
|description_of_result=The Library of Congress began adding important American recordings to the National Recording Registry in 2002 to ensure they would not be lost or forgotten. Billie Holiday’s recording of ‘Strange Fruit’ was one of 50 recordings added to the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry in its first year.
 +
|image=BillyHoliday.jpg
 +
}}
 +
[https://ig.ft.com/life-of-a-song/strange-fruit.html Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit — ‘the first unmuted cry against racism’], Financial Times, NOVEMBER 14, 2017
 +
 +
[https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2002/02/frut-f08.html "Strange Fruit": the story of a song], World Socialist Web Site, Feb 2002
  
[http://www.capecodtimes.com/news/20161209/artwork-sparks-free-speech-debate Artwork sparks free speech debate], Dec 9, 2016
 
  
[http://www.jaycritchley.com/artistcensored.html Artist Censored]
 
  
  

Latest revision as of 08:53, 14 February 2018

This Week's Featured Case



BillyHoliday.jpg

Artist: Billie Holiday; Censored song: "Strange Fruit"

Year: 1939

Date of Action: 1939

Region: North America


Subject: Political/Economic/Social Opinion

Medium: Music

Confronting Bodies: U.S. Radio and performance spaces

Description of Artwork: "Strange Fruit" is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939. It first appeared as apoem in 1937 under the title “Bitter Fruit” in the union publication The New York Teacher, having been written by a New York City public school teacher, Abel Meeropol. Set in the rustic loveliness of the “gallant South”, the poem provided a description of a “black body swinging in the southern breeze” with “the bulging eyes and the twisted mouth”; the scent of magnolia is supplanted by the stench of burning flesh. Meeropol set the poem to music. It protests American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. “Strange Fruit” has been called the original protest song.

In early 1939, Billie Holiday was performing in the newly-opened nightclub Café Society in lower Manhattan. Meeropol asked Barney Josephson, the owner of the club, if Holiday would sing it. She sang it to a stunned audience that broke into applause.

Holiday asked her label, Columbia, to record it but they declined, fearing a backlash. She went to Commodore Records; accompanied by her eight-piece Café Society band, they recorded it in a single afternoon. “Strange Fruit” would become her biggest hit and signature track.

The Incident: The song was blacklisted. Performance of the song was banned in some US cities for fear of provoking civil unrest. It was blocked From U.S. Radio stations.

Results of Incident: The Library of Congress began adding important American recordings to the National Recording Registry in 2002 to ensure they would not be lost or forgotten. Billie Holiday’s recording of ‘Strange Fruit’ was one of 50 recordings added to the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry in its first year.

Source:


Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit — ‘the first unmuted cry against racism’, Financial Times, NOVEMBER 14, 2017

"Strange Fruit": the story of a song, World Socialist Web Site, Feb 2002


















What is Censorpedia?

Censorpedia is a crowdsourced online database of censorship cases within the arts and in culture. It is aimed at those researching censorship, at activists working for freedom of expression and at artists and other cultural producers whose expression has been subject to censorship or attempted censorship.

Censorpedia documents censorship incidents by providing the who, what, when, where and why. By providing a repository of information about what is vulnerable to censorship and about the strategies and tactics that have defeated previous’ censorship attempts, Censorpedia aids the fight for free expression.

Researchers can search for a specific case, year or keyword using the search box, as well as browse by medium, by grounds for censorship, or explore a random case.

Activists can search for ongoing cases or contribute a case that is ongoing or recently resolved.

Artists and cultural producers are similarly invited to add cases they are directly involved with or are familiar with first hand.

Censorpedia builds on the landmark 1994 art project The File Room, initiated by Muntadas.

For more information about censorship visit our Annotated Bibliography


Feel free to:

Browse censorship cases by:


Censorpedia Terms of Use