Difference between revisions of "Fabula"

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'''The Incident:''' Emporess Zauditu understood the messages in Fabula and proceeded to ban not only it, but any other court performance.  
 
'''The Incident:''' Emporess Zauditu understood the messages in Fabula and proceeded to ban not only it, but any other court performance.  
 +
  
 
'''Results of Incident:''' When Zaudita died in 1930, the new emperor, Haile Selassie I, repealed the ban so that he could improve Ethiopia's reputation as a modernized nation.  
 
'''Results of Incident:''' When Zaudita died in 1930, the new emperor, Haile Selassie I, repealed the ban so that he could improve Ethiopia's reputation as a modernized nation.  
 +
  
 
'''Source:''' Censorship: A World Encyclopedia. Ed. Derek Jones. Chicago; London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2001.
 
'''Source:''' Censorship: A World Encyclopedia. Ed. Derek Jones. Chicago; London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2001.

Revision as of 13:14, 5 August 2011

Date: 1916

Region: Africa

Subject: Political/Economic/Social Opinion

Medium: Theater


Artist: Tekle Hawariat

Confronting Bodies: Zauditu, the empress of Ethiopia

Dates of Action: 1916

Location: Ethiopia

Description of Artwork: Fabula: Yawreoch Commedia is a play that uses animal characters to express Hawariat's criticisms of the corruption and backwardness of the court. Having lived in Europe, Hawarait expresses his distaste for Ethiopian culture and the ruling class in comparison to what he had seen. However, these criticisms are not very deeply buried within the performance.

The Incident: Emporess Zauditu understood the messages in Fabula and proceeded to ban not only it, but any other court performance. Results of Incident: When Zaudita died in 1930, the new emperor, Haile Selassie I, repealed the ban so that he could improve Ethiopia's reputation as a modernized nation. Source: Censorship: A World Encyclopedia. Ed. Derek Jones. Chicago; London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2001.